Bandra-Worli Sea Link, an engineering marvel

Posted: July 2, 2009 in others
Tags: , ,

The 5.6 km Bandra-Worli Sea Link is an engineering marvel and it has shown that Indian construction players have come of age, and are capable of  matching global counterparts. It is an ambitious eight-lane twin carriageway built over the Mahim Creek of  Arabian Sea. The bridge rests on two towers, each 126 metres tall or equivalent  to a 43-storeyed building. It is hoped that the eight-lane freeway will help cut the 40-minute journey between the suburbs of Bandra and Worli to just eight minutes. Called the Bandra-Worli Sea Link (BWSL) cost Rs.1,634-crore ($16.34 billion). The long-awaited Bandra-Worli sea link, seen as an engineering marvel, weighs equivalent to that of 50,000 African elephants and steel wire used is equivalent to the circumference of the earth. The 5.6 kilometer-long cable stayed bridge, to be opened by Congress President Sonia Gandhi on June 30, is 63 times the height of Qutub Minar and has consumed 90,000 tonnes of cement, which would suffice to make five buildings of 10-storey each. A treat to the eyes, the cost of illumination of the bridge would be Rs 9 crore and the height of the cable-stayed tower is equal to a 43-storey building.

A treat to the eyes, the cost of illumination of the bridge would be Rs nine crore and the height of the cable-stayed tower is equal to a 43-storey building.

A treat to the eyes, the cost of illumination of the bridge would be Rs nine crore and the height of the cable-stayed tower is equal to a 43-storey building.

An aerial view of the Bandra Worli Sea Link in Mumbai. The main span of the cable-stayed portion of the Bandra-Worli sea link measuring 500m is the largest in India superseding Vidyasagar Setu in Kolkata and shares the 20th spot with Thailand's Kanchanaphisek Bridge among the bridges with the longest span in the world. The Sutong Bridge over the Yangtze River in China, opened June last year, has the largest span of any cable-stayed bridge at 1,088 meters. Hong Kong's Stonecutters Bridge has the second longest span at 1,018 meters and with 890 meter the Tatara Bridge in Japan is the third longest.

An aerial view of the Bandra Worli Sea Link in Mumbai. The main span of the cable-stayed portion of the Bandra-Worli sea link measuring 500m is the largest in India superseding Vidyasagar Setu in Kolkata and shares the 20th spot with Thailand's Kanchanaphisek Bridge among the bridges with the longest span in the world. The Sutong Bridge over the Yangtze River in China, opened June last year, has the largest span of any cable-stayed bridge at 1,088 meters. Hong Kong's Stonecutters Bridge has the second longest span at 1,018 meters and with 890 meter the Tatara Bridge in Japan is the third longest.

A boat carrying media passes the 'Bandra-Worli Sea Link' being put in place in Mumbai on April 28. Main span is the distance between the suspension towers and is the most common way to rank cable-stayed bridges. The 5.6-km-long sea link has two cable-stayed bridges- Bandra channel with 50m-250m-250m-50m pan arrangement and the Worli channel with 50m-50m-150m-50m-50m. Both sides of the bridges are flanked by 50m conventional approach spans, which are not considered as the main span.

A boat carrying media passes the 'Bandra-Worli Sea Link' being put in place in Mumbai on April 28. Main span is the distance between the suspension towers and is the most common way to rank cable-stayed bridges. The 5.6-km-long sea link has two cable-stayed bridges- Bandra channel with 50m-250m-250m-50m pan arrangement and the Worli channel with 50m-50m-150m-50m-50m. Both sides of the bridges are flanked by 50m conventional approach spans, which are not considered as the main span.

Construction workers look on as the final section of the 'Bandra-Worli Sea Link' is put into place in Mumbai on April 28.

Construction workers look on as the final section of the 'Bandra-Worli Sea Link' is put into place in Mumbai on April 28.

The then Britain's Treasury chief Gordon Brown, third left, visits the construction of Bandra-Worli Sealink bridge on the Arabian sea in Mumbai on Jan. 19, 2007.

The then Britain's Treasury chief Gordon Brown, third left, visits the construction of Bandra-Worli Sealink bridge on the Arabian sea in Mumbai on Jan. 19, 2007.

Construction workers watch the final section of the 'Bandra-Worli Sea Link' being put in place in Mumbai. The Vidyasagar Setu has 457.2 m main span and it was so far the largest in India. The Naini Bridge over the Yamuna is also a cable-stayed one. The bridge is 63 times the height of Qutub Minar and has consumed 90,000 tonnes of cement, which would suffice to make five buildings of 10-storey each.

Construction workers watch the final section of the 'Bandra-Worli Sea Link' being put in place in Mumbai. The Vidyasagar Setu has 457.2 m main span and it was so far the largest in India. The Naini Bridge over the Yamuna is also a cable-stayed one. The bridge is 63 times the height of Qutub Minar and has consumed 90,000 tonnes of cement, which would suffice to make five buildings of 10-storey each.

Children play in the cool waters backdroped by the construction of the new Bandra-Worli sea link in Mumbai. Work on the 4.7km-long cable stayed bridge began in 2001 and is expected to be commissioned by June 30, 2009, linking Bandra and the western suburbs of Mumbai with Worli and central Mumbai and will carry about 80,000 vehicles daily.

Children play in the cool waters backdroped by the construction of the new Bandra-Worli sea link in Mumbai. Work on the 4.7km-long cable stayed bridge began in 2001 and is expected to be commissioned by June 30, 2009, linking Bandra and the western suburbs of Mumbai with Worli and central Mumbai and will carry about 80,000 vehicles daily.

A worker goes up in a lift above the Bandra-Worli sea link project in Mumbai. The infrastructure for the south-bound link of the 4.7km-long long cable-stayed bridge that links Bandra and the western suburbs of Mumbai with Worli, seen in background, and central Mumbai, was completed.

A worker goes up in a lift above the Bandra-Worli sea link project in Mumbai. The infrastructure for the south-bound link of the 4.7km-long long cable-stayed bridge that links Bandra and the western suburbs of Mumbai with Worli, seen in background, and central Mumbai, was completed.

. A worker goes up in a lift above the Bandra-Worli sea link project in Mumbai.

. A worker goes up in a lift above the Bandra-Worli sea link project in Mumbai.

A worker goes up in a lift above the Bandra-Worli sea link project in Mumbai.

A worker goes up in a lift above the Bandra-Worli sea link project in Mumbai.

A section of the Bandra-Worli sea link project is seen in Mumbai.

A section of the Bandra-Worli sea link project is seen in Mumbai.

Workers watch as a segment of the Bandra-Worli sea link project is put in place.

Workers watch as a segment of the Bandra-Worli sea link project is put in place.

A section of the Bandra-Worli sea link project.

A section of the Bandra-Worli sea link project.

Workers look on at the Bandra-Worli sea link project in Mumbai.

Workers look on at the Bandra-Worli sea link project in Mumbai.

A section of Mumbai's skyline with a fishing village in the foreground is seen from the Bandra-Worli sea link project in Mumbai.

A section of Mumbai's skyline with a fishing village in the foreground is seen from the Bandra-Worli sea link project in Mumbai.

Workers are seen on a section of the Bandra-Worli sea link project.

Workers are seen on a section of the Bandra-Worli sea link project.

Workers watch as a segment is put into place in the Bandra-Worli sea link project in Mumbai.

Workers watch as a segment is put into place in the Bandra-Worli sea link project in Mumbai.

Fishermen carry fish baskets in front of the new Bandra-Worli sea link in Mumbai.

Fishermen carry fish baskets in front of the new Bandra-Worli sea link in Mumbai.

Pictures: Google

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Comments
  1. JFK says:

    super!!!!

  2. subrotobose says:

    this is proud of our engineers great india .. mera bharat mahaan. subroto bose indore m. p.

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