Archive for the ‘others’ Category

Moving jobs? Don’t forget about the money in your provident fund account. Human resources executives say that when employees leave, they often withdraw their provident fund money, or sometimes they ignore it altogether. Others delay transferring it to their new employer in order to avoid the hassles involved.

These routes can be harmful. By delaying a transfer, you can potentially lose interest on your savings. By withdrawing too early, you could hurt your financial future.

“The idea of enabling a provident fund is to let a person live comfortably after retirement,” says Suresh Sadagopan, founder of Ladder7 Financial Advisories in Mumbai. If you retire at 55 but live till you are 85, the provident fund money will play a crucial part in helping you pay your bills over those 30 years. It could be the difference between a happy or a miserable retirement.

The Indian government requires all organizations with 20 or more employees to set up provident fund accounts for every member of staff. Both the company and employee contribute a certain percentage of the employee’s salary to the fund, and the money earns an interest fixed by the government. This year, it has been fixed at 9.5%.

That’s a hefty sum of money to ignore. Here’s a look at the options for your provident fund if or when you move jobs:

Should you withdraw?

Young employees or those who are leaving the workforce to become self-employed or turn entrepreneurs tend to withdraw their money.

“About 50% [of our] employees withdraw their provident fund while only 10% transfer it and the rest simply forget about it,” says Dayanand Allapur, head of human resources at Tesco Hindustan Service Center, a unit of U.K. retailer Tesco Plc. “This is the casual approach or the indifference to the benefits,” he says.

Some employees withdraw thinking that they will invest the money in some other form. “But they end up consuming it,” says Sumeet Vaid, founder of Freedom Wealth Solutions Pvt. in Mumbai.

That’s a bad idea. If you withdraw the money before completing five years of continuous service with a company, you’ll have to pay income tax on a large part of it. Depending on your overall income, the tax rate could be as high as 30%.

Withdrawing also means you lose other benefits, such as the possibility of using the money for major expenditures like buying a house or paying for your child’s wedding.

So, financial experts suggest withdrawals only in extreme cases.

You can apply to withdraw your provident fund money only after 60 days of leaving the company. The process is straightforward — ask the human resources executives for a withdrawal application form, in which you have to give details of the bank account where you want the money transferred. The money should reach your bank account within 60 to 90 days.

People going freelance or starting their own business should consider reinvesting the money in other long-term saving vehicles like the public provident fund or the New Pension Scheme, say advisers.

Transferring the money

Since your money grows tax-free as long as it stays in a provident fund account, you’re best off transferring it into the provident fund set up by your new employer.

Start the process as soon as possible, because if your money is still with your previous employer after three years of your departure, you won’t earn any interest on it. That’s an opportunity lost for you.

Also, delaying a transfer can add to your hassles. For instance, if you didn’t transfer money from a company where you worked several years ago, you might have to now deal with a new set of human resources executives there. What’s the chance that they’ll be helpful to you?

If your previous company has shut down, you would have to go to the government’s Employees’ Provident Fund Organization’s office.

To avoid such bother, it’s better to transfer accounts “as you move along,” says Charu Dewan, head of human resources at LeasePlan India Pvt., a vehicle leasing company.

To transfer your provident fund, approach your new company’s human resources team.  They will give you a transfer application form, Form-13, in which you’ll have to enter your previous provident fund account number, plus the dates of joining and leaving your previous company.

If you have several provident fund accounts from different employers, you’ll have to fill different forms for a transfer from each company.

Ideally, it should take less than six months for the money to be transferred. But sometimes previous employers sit on the transfer application, especially if you didn’t quit the right way.

In that case, be prepared to pester your previous employer by regularly checking up on the progress of your application.

You can also track of the status of your application on the website of the Employees’ Provident Fund Organization here.

(Source: The Wall Street Journal)

DOHA: Qatar has already attracted plenty of attention for the futuristic and colorful designs of its dozen proposed World Cup stadiums — including one shaped like a traditional Arabic fishing boat and another like a sea urchin.

Now the architects have unveiled detailed plans that will allow organisers to remove as many as 170,000 seats — including one entire stadium — from nine of the venues and send them to 22 locations in the developing world.

At a stadium conference in Doha this week, they said the initiative was aimed at insuring the World Cup would leave a lasting legacy.

“If we build up to the capacity which FIFA requires, afterward we would have a lot of white elephants around this area,” said Karin Bertaloth, whose firm is designing six new stadiums and two that will be upgraded.

“I don’t think Qatar needs this capacity.

We have the concept to build first tier of the stadium permanently and the second would only be for 2022.” Many of the stadiums also have plans to incorporate hotels, parks and even a spa, or the flexibility to be converted for athletics or other sports.

The push to consider the future of World Cup stadiums is nothing new, but has taken on much greater emphasis in Qatar, where a population of 1.6 million people means football clubs can barely fill a 15,000-seat stadium let alone some of the 80,000 behemoths that are required for a World Cup.

It also coincides with changing attitudes in stadium design, with developers under pressure to build facilities that are cheaper, more sustainable, and which have a long-term use beyond a sporting venue.

“Cities need to think about how a stadium can be used for alternative uses in the context of city, of the neighborhood, of the community it is in,” said Mark Fenwick, a director and partner with the designer of Education City, which will reduce from 45,000 seats to 25,000 after the World Cup.

Fenwick and others said Qatar’s approach also was inspired by the mistakes of past World Cups and Olympics, with several architects complimenting their presentations with photos of stadiums like those from the 2004 Athens Olympics which largely have gone unused or the Bird’s Nest in Beijing which is now little more than a tourist attraction.

South Africa, too, is struggling to make use of its 2010 World Cup stadiums.

Those in the northern cities of Rustenburg, Nelspruit and Polokwane, and in Port Elizabeth and Cape Town were all built from scratch.

They occasionally host games, but the cost of running the modern sites outweighs the income derived from small local crowds.

The company managing Cape Town’s $600-million, 65,000-capacity stadium — which held a World Cup semifinal — decided not to continue its contract after the tournament.

It has hosted just six club football matches this year.

Durban’s new Moses Mabhida Stadium is also rarely used, but will form the centerpiece of an expected Olympic bid from the east coast city.

“We are concerned,” said Eugene van Vuuren, a technical adviser for the 2010 World Cup who spoke at the three-day, Stadium and Venue Design and Development conference.

“We are sharing the stadiums and it is going well with all the existing stadiums.

But the new ones in Cape Town, in Durban, until they get it right where the rugby guys are joining the party they will always have a tough time.” Qatar not only wants to ensure it avoids empty stadiums but is hoping its venues can help transform and even build communities outside of the capital Doha.

Many of the 12 are being proposed for areas that are little more than patches of sand, and are expected to either be a destination for sports or education or the anchor for new residential developments.

“In Qatar, it’s less about the financial aspect of it as it is about what the World Cup can do for the country,” said Dan Meis, whose firm is building Sports City stadium which will have moving seats, a moving pitch and a retractable roof.

“The idea of creating buildings to be multipurpose and long use, it ends up developing a lot more and that becomes a legacy for Qatar.

The World Cup comes here, changes the country and creates development and experiences the country didn’t have before.” But Qatar is also using the World Cup to raise its profile on the international stage and that is where the stadium donations come in.

It plans to donate two 15,000-seat stadiums, eight 10,000-seat stadiums and 12 5,000-seat stadiums as part of a larger football development program that it says will “contribute emphatically to development of football and local society.” Van Vuuren welcomed Qatar’s offer to give away the seats but warned that it needs to factor in the upkeep and management of these new stadiums.

“It’s not just good to give facilities but you have to maintain and upkeep it,” he said.

“When you are in poorer countries, they just can’t do it.” Markus Pfisterer of the firm GMP also cautioned Qatar not to go too far in removing stadiums after the games, warning “that if you take it away and give it to somebody, you will have an empty parking lot at the end.

This is in our opinion not good for Qatar.”

(Source: Qatar Tribune)

When I went to meet my friend in Hyderabad, I realised how difficult it is to drive there. Not because of heavy traffic, but because of erratic traffic. Hardly anybody follows traffic rules, and we accustomed to follow traffic rules religiously in Bangalore, will find it quite difficult to drive there. When I suddenly saw a mail from one of my friends, my driving in Hyderabad lingered in my thoughts and I felt like sharing this article with all. Many will agree to what he says. If they, don’t I’ll tell them to try to drive once in Hyderabad!

This hilarious article was written by an expert from Baan, Netherlands, who spent two years in Hyderabad.

Driving in India For the benefit of every Tom, Dick and Harry visiting India and daring to drive on Indian roads, I am offering a few hints for survival. They are applicable to every place in India except Bihar, where life outside a vehicle is only marginally safer.

Indian road rules broadly operate within the domain of karma where you do your best, and leave the results to your insurance company. The hints are as follows:

Do we drive on the left or right of the road?

The answer is “both”. Basically you start on the left of the road, unless it is occupied. In that case, go to the right, unless that is also occupied. Then proceed by occupying the next available gap, as in chess. Just trust your instincts, ascertain the direction, and proceed. Adherence to road rules leads to much misery and occasional fatality. Most drivers don’t drive, but just aim their vehicles in the intended direction. Don’t you get discouraged or underestimate yourself except for a belief in reincarnation, the other drivers are not in any better position.

Don’t stop at pedestrian crossings just because some fool wants to cross the road. You may do so only if you enjoy being bumped in the back. Pedestrians have been strictly instructed to cross only when traffic is moving slowly or has come to a dead stop because some minister is in town. Still some idiot may try to wade across, but then, let us not talk ill of the dead.

Blowing your horn is not a sign of protest as in some countries. We horn to express joy, resentment, frustration, romance and bare lust (two brisk blasts), or, just mobilize a dozing cow in the middle of the bazaar.

Keep informative books in the glove compartment. You may read them during traffic jams, while awaiting the chief minister’s motorcade, or waiting for the rainwaters to recede when over ground traffic meets underground drainage.

Occasionally you might see what looks like a UFO with blinking colored lights and weird sounds emanating from within. This is an illuminated bus, full of happy pilgrims singing bhajans. These pilgrims go at breakneck speed, seeking contact with the Almighty, often meeting with success.

Auto Rickshaw (Baby Taxi): The result of a collision between a rickshaw and an automobile, this three-wheeled vehicle works on an external combustion engine that runs on a mixture of kerosene oil and creosote. This triangular vehicle carries iron rods, gas cylinders or passengers three times its weight and dimension, at an unspecified fare. After careful geometric calculations, children are folded and packed into these auto rickshaws until some children in the periphery are not in contact with the vehicle at all. Then their school bags are pushed into the microscopic gaps all round so those minor collisions with other vehicles on the road cause no permanent damage. Of course, the peripheral children are charged half the fare and also learn Newton’s laws of motion en route to school. Auto-rickshaw drivers follow the road rules depicted in the film Ben Hur, and are licensed to irritate.

Mopeds: The moped looks like an oil tin on wheels and makes noise like an electric shaver. It runs 30 miles on a teaspoon of petrol and travels at break-bottom speed. As the sides of the road are too rough for a ride, the moped drivers tend to drive in the middle of the road; they would rather drive under heavier vehicles instead of around them and are often “mopped” off the tarmac.

Leaning Tower of Passes: Most bus passengers are given free passes and during rush hours, there is absolute mayhem. There are passengers hanging off other passengers, who in turn hang off the railings and the overloaded bus leans dangerously, defying laws of gravity but obeying laws of surface tension. As drivers get paid for overload (so many Rupees per kg of passenger), no questions are ever asked. Steer clear of these buses by a width of three passengers.

One-way Street: These boards are put up by traffic people to add jest in their otherwise drab lives. Don’t stick to the literal meaning and proceed in one direction. In metaphysical terms, it means that you cannot proceed in two directions at once. So drive, as you like, in reverse throughout, if you are the fussy type. Least I sound hypercritical; I must add a positive point also. Rash and fast driving in residential areas has been prevented by providing a “speed breaker”; two for each house.

This mound, incidentally, covers the water and drainage pipes for that residence and is left untarred for easy identification by the corporation authorities, should they want to recover the pipe for year-end accounting.

Night driving on Indian roads can be an exhilarating experience (for those with the mental makeup of Chenghis Khan). In a way, it is like playing Russian roulette, because you do not know who amongst the drivers is loaded. What looks like premature dawn on the horizon turns out to be a truck attempting a speed record. On encountering it, just pull partly into the field adjoining the road until the phenomenon passes. Our roads do not have shoulders, but occasional boulders. Do not blink your lights expecting reciprocation. The only dim thing in the truck is the driver, and with the peg of illicit arrack (alcohol) he has had at the last stop, his total cerebral functions add up to little more than a naught. Truck drivers are the James Bonds of India, and are licensed to kill. Often you may encounter a single powerful beam of light about six feet above the ground. This is not a super motorbike, but a truck approaching you with a single light on, usually the left one. It could be the right one, but never get too close to investigate. You may prove your point posthumously. Of course, all this occurs at night, on the trunk roads. During the daytime, trucks are more visible, except that the drivers will never show any Signal. (And you must watch for the absent signals; they are the greater threat). Only, you will often observe that the cleaner who sits next to the driver, will project his hand and wave hysterically.

This is definitely not to be construed as a signal for a left turn. The waving is just a statement of physical relief on a hot day.

If, after all this, you still want to drive in India, have your lessons between 8 pm and 11 am-when the police have gone home and The citizen is then free to enjoy the ‘FREEDOM OF SPEED’ enshrined in our constitution.

Having said all this, isn’t it true that the accident rate and related deaths are less in India compared to the US or other countries!!? ?

Dogs can be great stress busters

Posted: December 6, 2009 in others
Tags: , , ,

After Dinku passed away, my dad is so engrossed in other things that he hardly finds time to indulge in a fitness routine, forget about going for a morning walk. It was not the same with him earlier. He had a walking partner in Dinku, who liked to jump at the mention of walk in morning. Evening he gave company to my mom. Together, they used to go for a walk, rather say, a fitness walk. Now, I feel how dogs come to the rescue of human beings, acting as true friends as well perfect walking companions. Health is wealth and a dog at home can help maintain health of the family and save money. If there is health, no need to frequently visit the doc [docs will curse the dogs ;)].

Dinku always had time for us, come rain or sunshine. He had to be taken for a walk twice in a day. It made my parents to take him along for a walk regularly. So, even if they were not in the mood for a walk, he kept them pestering, till they gave in and put on their walking shoes. When he was there, they hardly missed their walking sessions.

Dogs can be great companions. Once my parents developed a routine of walking with him, he ensured that they follow it on a regular basis, that too at a fixed time. He never ever let them forget that it is the time for them to get up and get going! Specially, he had that capability of charging my dad up, enhancing his energy levels, so that he walked faster and with much more enthusiasm. Need not to say that it burned more calories and improved his overall fitness levels. People never believe that he has crossed 60 years! Dinku served as a great stress buster and walking with him helped us forget all our worries and relax our mind as well.

I strongly feel that walking with dogs or say dog walking is one of the cheapest and most enjoyable ways to ensure fitness. My dad has made several friends. Many small kids in the neighbourhood talk to him and fondly approach him for he allowed them to talk and go close to Dinku. Yeah, Dinku was close and loves to play with children 🙂 Not just children, if we walk with our dog, we end up making new friends as well.

I found some strange stories about Nobel laureates.

1. Robert Lucas is winner of the 1995 Nobel Prize in economics for his work on the theory of “rational expectations,” split his $1 million prize with his ex-wife.

Robert Lucas

Robert Lucas

If there were a Nobel Prize for Foresight or Timing, she should be nominated, based on a clause in their divorce settlement from seven years earlier: “Wife shall receive 50 per cent of any Nobel Prize.” The clause expired on October 31, 1995. Had Lucas won any year after, he would have kept the whole million.

2. Physicist Lise Meitner, whose work helped lead to the discovery of nuclear fission, was reportedly nominated for the Nobel Prize 13 times without ever winning (though nominations are kept secret, so we don’t know for sure).

Lise Meitner

Lise Meitner

This makes her the Dynasty of the Nobel Prize scene — that show was nominated for 24 Emmy Awards but never won. Other analogies we’d accept: The Color Purple (11 Oscar nominations in 1985, no wins), the Buffalo Bills or Minnesota Vikings (4 Super Bowl losses each without a victory) and William Jennings Bryan (three-time Democratic nominee for President, losing twice to McKinley and once to Taft.)

3. People who refused the Nobel Prize:

(i) Le Duc Tho was awarded the 1973 Nobel Peace Prize with Henry Kissinger for their roles in brokering a Vietnam cease fire at the Paris Peace Accords.

Le Duc Tho

Le Duc Tho

 Le Duc Tho with Henry Kissinger

Le Duc Tho with Henry Kissinger

Citing the absence of actual peace in Vietnam, Tho declined to accept.

(ii) Jean Paul Sartre waved off the 1964 Nobel Prize in Literature.

Jean Paul Sartre

Jean Paul Sartre

His explanation: “It is not the same thing if I sign Jean-Paul Sartre or if I sign Jean-Paul Sartre, Nobel Prize winner. A writer must refuse to allow himself to be transformed into an institution, even if it takes place in the most honorable form.”

(iii) Afraid of Soviet retribution if he travelled to Stockholm to claim his prize, Boris Pasternak declined to accept the 1958 Prize in Literature, which he’d earned for Doctor Zhivago.

Boris Pasternak

Boris Pasternak

The Academy refused his refusal. “This refusal, of course, in no way alters the validity of the award. There remains only for the Academy, however, to announce with regret that the presentation of the Prize cannot take place.” Yevgeny Pasternak accepted the prize on behalf of his deceased father in 1989.

(iv) Swedish poet Erik Axel Karlfeldt won Nobel for Literature in 1918.

Erik Axel Karlfeldt

Erik Axel Karlfeldt

He did not accept because he was secretary of the Swedish Academy, which awards the prize. He was given the award posthumously in 1931. This was allowed because the nomination was made before Karlfeldt died — no candidate may be proposed after death.

4. In 2007, 90-year-old professor Leonid Hurwicz became the oldest person to ever win (one-third of the Prize in Economics); at 87,

Leonid Hurwiczwriter Doris Lessing became the oldest woman (Literature).

 Doris Lessing

Doris Lessing

5. DNA expert Kary Mullis — 1993 winner of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry — was scheduled to be a defense witness in O.J. Simpson’s murder trial.

Kary Mullis

Kary Mullis

However, Simpson’s lawyer Barry Scheck felt the prosecution’s DNA case was already essentially destroyed, and he didn’t want Mullis’ personal life to distract jurors (he’d expressed an affinity for LSD.)

6. Big names who never won:

Dmitri Mendeleev, Leo Tolstoy, Virginia Woolf, James Joyce, Marcel Proust, Mark Twain, Gertrude Stein, Henrik Ibsen, Joan Robinson, Thomas Edison, Nikola Tesla, Jules-Henri Poincaré, Raymond Damadian and Mahatma Gandhi.

Dmitri Mendeleev

Dmitri Mendeleev

Gertrude Stein

Gertrude Stein

Henrik Ibsen

Henrik Ibsen

James Joyce

James Joyce

Joan Robinson

Joan Robinson

 Jules-Henri Poincaré

Jules-Henri Poincaré

Leo Tolstoy

Leo Tolstoy

Mahatma Gandhi

Mahatma Gandhi

Marcel Proust

Marcel Proust

Mark Twain

Mark Twain

Nikola Tesla

Nikola Tesla

Raymond Damadian

Raymond Damadian

Thomas Edison

Thomas Edison

Virginia Woolf

Virginia Woolf

7. Winners without the greatest reputations:

(i) Daniel Carleton Gajdusek, who won in 1976 for his research in human slow-virus infections, spent 19 months in jail after pleading guilty in 1997 to charges of child molestation.

Daniel Carleton Gajdusek

Daniel Carleton Gajdusek

(ii) Johannes Fibiger won in 1926 after discovering parasitic worms cause cancer — a breakthrough that turned out to not be true.

Johannes Fibiger

Johannes Fibiger

(iii) Yasser Arafat shared the 1994 Nobel Peace Prize with Shimon Peres and Yitzhak Rabin.

Yasser Arafat

Yasser Arafat

Shimon Peres

Shimon Peres

This decision caused Nobel Committee member Kare Kristiansen to resign.

Yitzhak Rabin

Yitzhak Rabin

“What consequences will result,” he asked at the time, “when a terrorist with such a background is awarded the world’s most prestigious prize?”

(iv) William Shockley won for Physics in 1956 for his role in the invention of the semiconductor, but his support of the eugenics movement alienated the scientific community.

William Shockley

William Shockley

Shockley also donated sperm to the Repository for Germinal Choice, a sperm bank developed to spread humanity’s best genes.

8. As part of his divorce settlement, Einstein’s Nobel Prize money went to his ex-wife, Mileva Maric.

Mileva Maric with einstein

Mileva Maric with einstein

9. The Curie family is a Nobel Prize machine, winning five: Pierre and Marie for Physics in 1901;

Pierre Curie with Marie

Pierre Curie with Marie

Marie solo for Chemistry in 1911; daughter Irene and her husband Frédéric Joliot-Curie for Chemistry in 1935;

Frédéric Joliot with Irene Curie

Frédéric Joliot with Irene Curie

and Henry Labouisse — Irene’s daughter Eve’s second husband — accepted on behalf of UNICEF in 1965. No family has won more.

Henry Labouisse (left)

Henry Labouisse (left)

10. Marie Curie’s second prize was marred by a scandal. Then a widow, Curie had an affair with a married scientist, Paul Langevin — a former pupil of Pierre Curie.

 Paul Langevin

Paul Langevin

Love letters were involved, eventually leading to a duel between Langevin and the editor of the newspaper that had printed them (no shots were actually fired.) According to NobelPrize.org, when it was suggested that Curie not accept the prize, she wrote a shrewd letter, “which pointed out that she had been awarded the Prize for her discovery of radium and polonium, and that she could not accept the principle that appreciation of the value of scientific work should be influenced by slander concerning a researcher’s private life.”

11. Singing support — While there’s no evidence the Nobel judges can be swayed by theme songs, that hasn’t stopped Loriana Lana from composing one for Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi.

 Loriana Lana

Loriana Lana

“Peace Can” includes the lyrics, “Silvio forever will be / Silvio is reality / Silvio forever! /Silvio gives us trust.”

12. Alfred Nobel — inventor of dynamite — may have been inspired to create the Nobel Prize after a premature obituary in a French newspaper called him a “merchant of death.”

Alfred Nobel

Alfred Nobel

13. Nobel died on December 10, 1896. The formal awards ceremony is held in Stockholm each year on the anniversary of his death. The first awards show took place on December 10, 1901.

Pics courtesy: Google

Whenever I watch Tom and Jerry, Iwonder how the tiny rat could outsmart the big cat. Then I console myself thinking that it is just a cartoon meant to entertain kids. But today when I came across a report which dubbed a field mouse as the bravest m,ouse in Britain, I was little surprised.

A field mouse was able to fend off a cat from its natural habitat by standing up to it outside its nest. It made itself as big as possible to the cat after it ventured too near to its nest in Swavesey, Cambs.

Instead of running for its life, the mouse squared up to its larger opponent and stood his ground. Eventually, the cat got bored and turned away, before the mouse went back into its home.

Field mouse scares off its predator

Field mouse scares off its predator

“It was incredible, the little mouse stood up and seemed to be roaring at the cat,” said Wendy Rothwell, 45, who spotted the encounter in her back garden.  “The cat was much bigger than him and could have killed him at any moment but he didn’t seem to care. He seemed to be prepared to do anything to protect his home. He must be the bravest field mouse in the country.”

Pic courtesy: Google

I always felt that Michael Jackson might have hated his colour, being a Black, being an African, which might have made him to always yearn for a fair skin, go for plastic surgery and date fair women. I have never heard about his affairs with any Black women. In a country like United States, one can understand a person’s feeling of being a black.

I read Tony Morrison’s The Blue Eyes in my postgraduation and was deeply moved by the plight of Blacks in America. Whenever I heard about Jackson, I imagined his situation and plight in the background of that novel. Many works on the plight of Blacks have come out on the theme and Jackson’s transformation from Black to a White is just a living example the world witnessed. Their situation and condition was no different from Dalits in our country. In fact, I had presented a paper in a seminar on their plight comparing with Dalits in our country. Though Blacks form a race and Dalits a community, I still find similarities in the oppression and sufferings. They like our oppressed communities dream of coming to the mainstream society. They imagine themselves to befriend other sections of the society and they find no other way, but to upgrade themselves either by marrying people from upper class or rebel against the system.

I think Jacko found himself a new way to find place among the Whites. He didn’t rebel against the system, he transformed himself, he gave up his colour, the very identity to become one among the larger section of society, a White, whom the whole world adored and admired.

While thinking about all these, I found an interesting interview in Details, an interview by the hit-making producer, Quincy Jones, who was behind the King of Pop’s rise discussing Jackson’s life, death, and love of chemical peels. Jones, who first worked with Jackson on 1979’s Off the Wall, told Details they’d talk “all the time” about how Jackson was changing.

Jacko and Quincy

Jacko and Quincy

Did you believe him about the disease?
I don’t believe in any of that bullshit, no. No. Never. I’ve been around junkies and stuff all my life. I’ve heard every excuse. It’s like smokers — “I only smoke when I drink” and all that stuff. But it’s bullshit. You’re justifying something that’s destructive to your existence. It’s crazy. I mean, I came up with Ray Charles, man. You know, nobody gonna pull no wool over my eyes. He did heroin 20 years! Come on. And black coffee and gin for 40 years. But when he called me to come over to see him when he was in the hospital on his way out, man, he had emphysema, hepatitis C, cirrhosis of the liver, and five malignant tumors. Please, man! I’ve been around this all my life. So it’s hard for somebody to pull the wool over my eyes. But when somebody’s hell-bent on it, you can’t stop ’em.

But it must’ve been so disturbing to see Michael’s face turn into what it turned into.
It’s ridiculous, man! Chemical peels and all of it. And I don’t understand it. But he obviously didn’t want to be black.

Is that what it was?
Well, what do you think? You see his kids?

Did you ever discuss it? Did you ever ask, “Michael, don’t you want to be a black man?”
No, no, no, please. That’s not the way you do it.

But he was beautiful before?
Man, he was the most gorgeous guy.

But he seemed to have some deep-seated issue with how he looked?
Well, that comes about a certain way. I’m not sure how it happens. I’m just a musician and a record producer. I’m not a psychiatrist. I don’t understand all that stuff. We all got problems. But there’s a great book out called Too Soon Old, Too Late Smart. Did you see that? That book says the statute of limitations has expired on all childhood traumas. Get your stuff together and get on with your life, man. Stop whinin’ about what’s wrong, because everybody’s had a rough time, in one way or another.

I’ve heard you say that you wanted Michael to sing “She’s Out of My Life,” the great pop ballad from Off the Wall, in part because you felt like he had to deal with reality.
I just wanted to hear him deal with a romantic relationship with a human being rather than a rat. I’m saying that facetiously, but it’s true. I saw him at the Oscars very emotional about “Ben.” I wanted to hear him get in touch with a real human relationship. “She’s Out of My Life” was written by Tommy Bahler from a very bad ending to a marriage. So it was very real. I was saving it for Sinatra. But I gave it to Michael. And Michael cried during every take, and I left the tears in.

It’s interesting you mention this, because I was just watching a clip on YouTube where you’re sitting on a couch with Michael and he’s petting a snake the whole time.
Oh, I remember that. Yeah, that was Muscles.

Muscles?
Muscles. That’s a big boa constrictor he had. Muscles used to wrap around my leg in a record session and crawl across the console. I was never comfortable with that. It was a choice between that and Bubbles — you know, the chimp.

Did you ever meet Bubbles?
Are you kidding me? He bit a hole in my daughter’s hand! Rashida’s hand. Rashida Jones — did you see I Love You, Man? That’s my daughter. She was a little girl. And Bubbles bit her hand. Michael used to bring Muscles and Bubbles by the house all the time, you know.

What did you think of that? Wasn’t that a little weird?
I don’t know, man. Everybody does his own thing. I’ve met every freak in the business. Everybody has their idiosyncrasies. I try not to judge it, you know. I know all women are junkies for little dogs and bags and purses. Ha ha ha ha!

At root, what do you think killed Michael Jackson?
I don’t know, man. I’m a musician. I’m not a psychiatrist. I would think that the pressure of the concerts and the debt and everything else… look, I’ve been in the hands of Nobel doctors for the last five years, in Stockholm, at the Karolinska hospital, which you can’t even pay to get in. I’ve learned so much about the human mind and the body, and the doctors talk all the time about how you become your thoughts. It’s true. With one thought it starts, you know, and if you sit there and just stay hung up on one negative thought, you will become that thought. I know that Lisa Marie Presley said that she always thought he was going to die like Elvis. You sit and think about that stuff, it’ll happen to you. If you start thinking about darkness instead of light, or fear instead of love, you’ll get in trouble. I really believe that.

With so many people asking you about Michael Jackson, is it hard to find the private space in which to mourn his death?
Yes, it is. It’s surrealistic. I don’t know how to process it at all. Because everybody’s reacting to it, and making up their own answers.

You’ve said that you don’t attend funerals anymore because you’ve lost so many friends. Do you plan to attend Michael Jackson’s funeral?
No, not at all, not at all. Because it’s going to be, like, 9 million people there, and it’s not what I want to see.

You’re not going to be there?
No. I can’t be there, anyway. I’m going to Wales the day after tomorrow, I go to Montreux, I go to Marbella, I go to the south of France. My condolences and love I’ve already sent to the family. But being there with 10 million people is not my idea of a tribute to somebody you were so close to — who’s got a part of your soul. Our souls were joined, you know. And a piece of it goes with him.

The 5.6 km Bandra-Worli Sea Link is an engineering marvel and it has shown that Indian construction players have come of age, and are capable of  matching global counterparts. It is an ambitious eight-lane twin carriageway built over the Mahim Creek of  Arabian Sea. The bridge rests on two towers, each 126 metres tall or equivalent  to a 43-storeyed building. It is hoped that the eight-lane freeway will help cut the 40-minute journey between the suburbs of Bandra and Worli to just eight minutes. Called the Bandra-Worli Sea Link (BWSL) cost Rs.1,634-crore ($16.34 billion). The long-awaited Bandra-Worli sea link, seen as an engineering marvel, weighs equivalent to that of 50,000 African elephants and steel wire used is equivalent to the circumference of the earth. The 5.6 kilometer-long cable stayed bridge, to be opened by Congress President Sonia Gandhi on June 30, is 63 times the height of Qutub Minar and has consumed 90,000 tonnes of cement, which would suffice to make five buildings of 10-storey each. A treat to the eyes, the cost of illumination of the bridge would be Rs 9 crore and the height of the cable-stayed tower is equal to a 43-storey building.

A treat to the eyes, the cost of illumination of the bridge would be Rs nine crore and the height of the cable-stayed tower is equal to a 43-storey building.

A treat to the eyes, the cost of illumination of the bridge would be Rs nine crore and the height of the cable-stayed tower is equal to a 43-storey building.

An aerial view of the Bandra Worli Sea Link in Mumbai. The main span of the cable-stayed portion of the Bandra-Worli sea link measuring 500m is the largest in India superseding Vidyasagar Setu in Kolkata and shares the 20th spot with Thailand's Kanchanaphisek Bridge among the bridges with the longest span in the world. The Sutong Bridge over the Yangtze River in China, opened June last year, has the largest span of any cable-stayed bridge at 1,088 meters. Hong Kong's Stonecutters Bridge has the second longest span at 1,018 meters and with 890 meter the Tatara Bridge in Japan is the third longest.

An aerial view of the Bandra Worli Sea Link in Mumbai. The main span of the cable-stayed portion of the Bandra-Worli sea link measuring 500m is the largest in India superseding Vidyasagar Setu in Kolkata and shares the 20th spot with Thailand's Kanchanaphisek Bridge among the bridges with the longest span in the world. The Sutong Bridge over the Yangtze River in China, opened June last year, has the largest span of any cable-stayed bridge at 1,088 meters. Hong Kong's Stonecutters Bridge has the second longest span at 1,018 meters and with 890 meter the Tatara Bridge in Japan is the third longest.

A boat carrying media passes the 'Bandra-Worli Sea Link' being put in place in Mumbai on April 28. Main span is the distance between the suspension towers and is the most common way to rank cable-stayed bridges. The 5.6-km-long sea link has two cable-stayed bridges- Bandra channel with 50m-250m-250m-50m pan arrangement and the Worli channel with 50m-50m-150m-50m-50m. Both sides of the bridges are flanked by 50m conventional approach spans, which are not considered as the main span.

A boat carrying media passes the 'Bandra-Worli Sea Link' being put in place in Mumbai on April 28. Main span is the distance between the suspension towers and is the most common way to rank cable-stayed bridges. The 5.6-km-long sea link has two cable-stayed bridges- Bandra channel with 50m-250m-250m-50m pan arrangement and the Worli channel with 50m-50m-150m-50m-50m. Both sides of the bridges are flanked by 50m conventional approach spans, which are not considered as the main span.

Construction workers look on as the final section of the 'Bandra-Worli Sea Link' is put into place in Mumbai on April 28.

Construction workers look on as the final section of the 'Bandra-Worli Sea Link' is put into place in Mumbai on April 28.

The then Britain's Treasury chief Gordon Brown, third left, visits the construction of Bandra-Worli Sealink bridge on the Arabian sea in Mumbai on Jan. 19, 2007.

The then Britain's Treasury chief Gordon Brown, third left, visits the construction of Bandra-Worli Sealink bridge on the Arabian sea in Mumbai on Jan. 19, 2007.

Construction workers watch the final section of the 'Bandra-Worli Sea Link' being put in place in Mumbai. The Vidyasagar Setu has 457.2 m main span and it was so far the largest in India. The Naini Bridge over the Yamuna is also a cable-stayed one. The bridge is 63 times the height of Qutub Minar and has consumed 90,000 tonnes of cement, which would suffice to make five buildings of 10-storey each.

Construction workers watch the final section of the 'Bandra-Worli Sea Link' being put in place in Mumbai. The Vidyasagar Setu has 457.2 m main span and it was so far the largest in India. The Naini Bridge over the Yamuna is also a cable-stayed one. The bridge is 63 times the height of Qutub Minar and has consumed 90,000 tonnes of cement, which would suffice to make five buildings of 10-storey each.

Children play in the cool waters backdroped by the construction of the new Bandra-Worli sea link in Mumbai. Work on the 4.7km-long cable stayed bridge began in 2001 and is expected to be commissioned by June 30, 2009, linking Bandra and the western suburbs of Mumbai with Worli and central Mumbai and will carry about 80,000 vehicles daily.

Children play in the cool waters backdroped by the construction of the new Bandra-Worli sea link in Mumbai. Work on the 4.7km-long cable stayed bridge began in 2001 and is expected to be commissioned by June 30, 2009, linking Bandra and the western suburbs of Mumbai with Worli and central Mumbai and will carry about 80,000 vehicles daily.

A worker goes up in a lift above the Bandra-Worli sea link project in Mumbai. The infrastructure for the south-bound link of the 4.7km-long long cable-stayed bridge that links Bandra and the western suburbs of Mumbai with Worli, seen in background, and central Mumbai, was completed.

A worker goes up in a lift above the Bandra-Worli sea link project in Mumbai. The infrastructure for the south-bound link of the 4.7km-long long cable-stayed bridge that links Bandra and the western suburbs of Mumbai with Worli, seen in background, and central Mumbai, was completed.

. A worker goes up in a lift above the Bandra-Worli sea link project in Mumbai.

. A worker goes up in a lift above the Bandra-Worli sea link project in Mumbai.

A worker goes up in a lift above the Bandra-Worli sea link project in Mumbai.

A worker goes up in a lift above the Bandra-Worli sea link project in Mumbai.

A section of the Bandra-Worli sea link project is seen in Mumbai.

A section of the Bandra-Worli sea link project is seen in Mumbai.

Workers watch as a segment of the Bandra-Worli sea link project is put in place.

Workers watch as a segment of the Bandra-Worli sea link project is put in place.

A section of the Bandra-Worli sea link project.

A section of the Bandra-Worli sea link project.

Workers look on at the Bandra-Worli sea link project in Mumbai.

Workers look on at the Bandra-Worli sea link project in Mumbai.

A section of Mumbai's skyline with a fishing village in the foreground is seen from the Bandra-Worli sea link project in Mumbai.

A section of Mumbai's skyline with a fishing village in the foreground is seen from the Bandra-Worli sea link project in Mumbai.

Workers are seen on a section of the Bandra-Worli sea link project.

Workers are seen on a section of the Bandra-Worli sea link project.

Workers watch as a segment is put into place in the Bandra-Worli sea link project in Mumbai.

Workers watch as a segment is put into place in the Bandra-Worli sea link project in Mumbai.

Fishermen carry fish baskets in front of the new Bandra-Worli sea link in Mumbai.

Fishermen carry fish baskets in front of the new Bandra-Worli sea link in Mumbai.

Pictures: Google

At last, my doubts got some relief. I wondered how Jacko would be buried, for he had convereted to Islam and changed his name in th elast years. I was curious to know if Christian last rites would be followed to lay him in the rest or the Muslim rites!

And to end my curiosity, I saw a report which revealed that Jackson’s family might go for a traditional Islamic burial rituals for the late pop legend.

“The family is considering the Muslim burial traditions because they believe Michael would have wanted to be laid to rest in keeping with his new-found religious beliefs,” aceshowbiz.com quoted a source as saying.

“Michael’s brother Jermaine is educating the family as to the special rites because he feels it’s important to bury his brother according to the Muslim way,” added the source.

Despite earlier reports that both public and private memorial services for the late music performer have been set to be held this week, there has been no official confirmation yet from Jackson’s family on the location where his body will be laid to rest.

Jackson reportedly converted to Islam in late 2008, years after expressing his interest to join the faith. He later on changed his name into “Mikaeel”, which was meant as a reference to the name of one of Allah’s angels.

Got some pics of Michael Jackson on Google. Nice ones. Show his life from his childhood till the end.

The face of a young Michael Jackson as he appeared in the era of the Jackson 5 and their discovery at the famous Apollo Theatre in Harlem

The face of a young Michael Jackson as he appeared in the era of the Jackson 5 and their discovery at the famous Apollo Theatre in Harlem

Michael Jackson as he appeared in January 1978 during the filming of "The Wiz", a reinterpretation of "The Wizard of Oz" set in New York

Michael Jackson as he appeared in January 1978 during the filming of "The Wiz", a reinterpretation of "The Wizard of Oz" set in New York

Michael Jackson as he looked in 1979 at 21 years old

Michael Jackson as he looked in 1979 at 21 years old

A 29-year-old Michael Jackson poses on 15th September, 1987

A 29-year-old Michael Jackson poses on 15th September, 1987

Michael Jackson as he appeared in 1997 at the The Pantages Theatre in Los Angeles, California

Michael Jackson as he appeared in 1997 at the The Pantages Theatre in Los Angeles, California

A masked Michael Jackson arriving at the Oxford Union on the 6th March 2001...

A masked Michael Jackson arriving at the Oxford Union on the 6th March 2001...

...to give a lecture, and launch his global initiative for children "Heal the Kids"

...to give a lecture, and launch his global initiative for children "Heal the Kids"

Michael Jackson testifies in Santa Barbara County Superior Court, on the 13th of November, 2002 in Santa Maria, California as part of a $21 million lawsuit with his longtime promoter, that accuses the singer of backing out of two millennium concerts

Michael Jackson testifies in Santa Barbara County Superior Court, on the 13th of November, 2002 in Santa Maria, California as part of a $21 million lawsuit with his longtime promoter, that accuses the singer of backing out of two millennium concerts

Michael Jackson leaving the Santa Barbara County courthouse on the 3rd of June, 2005, in California as jury deliberations on Jackson's child sex trial began

Michael Jackson leaving the Santa Barbara County courthouse on the 3rd of June, 2005, in California as jury deliberations on Jackson's child sex trial began

Michael Jackson poses on the red carpet during the RainbowPUSH Coalition Los Angeles 10th annual awards on the 8th of November, 2007

Michael Jackson poses on the red carpet during the RainbowPUSH Coalition Los Angeles 10th annual awards on the 8th of November, 2007

Michael Jackson with Bubbles the chimp and a pet llama

Michael Jackson with Bubbles the chimp and a pet llama

Michael Jackson and his then-wife Lisa-Marie Presley enjoying their honeymoon at Euro Disneyland on the 6th of September, 1994, where they stayed in the Sleeping Beauty Suite of the Disneyland Hotel

Michael Jackson and his then-wife Lisa-Marie Presley enjoying their honeymoon at Euro Disneyland on the 6th of September, 1994, where they stayed in the Sleeping Beauty Suite of the Disneyland Hotel

Michael Jackson and his then-wife Lisa-Marie Presley enjoying their honeymoon at Euro Disneyland on the 6th of September, 1994, where they stayed in the Sleeping Beauty Suite of the Disneyland Hotel

Michael Jackson and his then-wife Lisa-Marie Presley enjoying their honeymoon at Euro Disneyland on the 6th of September, 1994, where they stayed in the Sleeping Beauty Suite of the Disneyland Hotel

Michael Jackson is pictured in his Santa Barbara County Sheriff's Department booking mugshot in California on the 20th of November 2003

Michael Jackson is pictured in his Santa Barbara County Sheriff's Department booking mugshot in California on the 20th of November 2003

Michael Jackson, wearing an abaya, a traditional women's veil and gown, holds the hand of a child as he shakes hands with a shopping mall security agent in Manama, Bahrain on the 25th of January, 2006

Michael Jackson, wearing an abaya, a traditional women's veil and gown, holds the hand of a child as he shakes hands with a shopping mall security agent in Manama, Bahrain on the 25th of January, 2006

Michael Jackson in a wheelchair while out shopping with his children in Las Vegas on the 7th of October, 2008

Michael Jackson in a wheelchair while out shopping with his children in Las Vegas on the 7th of October, 2008

Michael Jackson shopping for antiques around Beverly Hills on the 21st of April, 2009

Michael Jackson shopping for antiques around Beverly Hills on the 21st of April, 2009

A veiled Michael Jackson accompanied by his three children on a visit to a doctors office in Beverly Hills on April 27th, 2009

A veiled Michael Jackson accompanied by his three children on a visit to a doctors office in Beverly Hills on April 27th, 2009

Michael Jackson was born on Aug. 29, 1958, in Gary, Indiana, the seventh of nine children. Five Jackson boys – Jackie, Tito, Jermaine, Marlon and Michael – first performed together at a talent show when Michael was 6. They walked off with first prize.

Michael Jackson was born on Aug. 29, 1958, in Gary, Indiana, the seventh of nine children. Five Jackson boys – Jackie, Tito, Jermaine, Marlon and Michael – first performed together at a talent show when Michael was 6. They walked off with first prize.

In 1978 he would meet producer Quincy Jones. A collaboration which produces some of his greatest hits

In 1978 he would meet producer Quincy Jones. A collaboration which produces some of his greatest hits

after releasing Thriller album

after releasing Thriller album

In 1987 he released the album Bad and bought the Neverland ranch in California

In 1987 he released the album Bad and bought the Neverland ranch in California

Michael Jackson arrives with Debbie Rowe for a performance of the play "Sisterella," April 28, 1996, in Pasadena, Calif. It was reported Friday, Oct 8, 1999, that Jackson and his wife, Debbie Rowe Jackson, have filed for a divorce.

Michael Jackson arrives with Debbie Rowe for a performance of the play "Sisterella," April 28, 1996, in Pasadena, Calif. It was reported Friday, Oct 8, 1999, that Jackson and his wife, Debbie Rowe Jackson, have filed for a divorce.

Pop star Michael Jackson (C) holds the hands of two unidentifed children with their faces covered during a visit to Berlin Zoo, November 20, 2002. Jackson is in Berlin to be awarded with the  Bambi 2002 media award.

Pop star Michael Jackson (C) holds the hands of two unidentifed children with their faces covered during a visit to Berlin Zoo, November 20, 2002. Jackson is in Berlin to be awarded with the Bambi 2002 media award.